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Mannheim Center for Translational Neuroscience

The Mannheim Center for Translational Neuroscience (MCTN) at Heidelberg University provides a platform for basic research-oriented, translational and clinical neuroscientists from the Medical Faculty Mannheim to work closely with the Central Institute for Mental Health, the life science research institutions of the University Heidelberg and with the non-university research institutions in the Rhine-Neckar metropolitan area.

News

Balancing neuronal activity

To process information in our brains, neurons produce brief electrical impulses, called action potentials, triggered from one highly specialized region at the cell’s axon, called the axon initial segment (AIS). Scientists from the Institute of Neuroanatomy at the Mannheim Center for Translational Neuroscience (MCTN), together with researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience in Amsterdam and the University of Göttingen now show that the AIS surprisingly changes with experience: It shrinks with increasing experience and, vice versa, elongates when less input arrives in the brain. This reversible effect could contribute to balancing all neuronal activity generated within a distinct functional network in the brain. read more …

BMBF supported project Nphys (Magerl) 16GW0293

„Einfluss FKBP51-überinduzierender Genotypen auf Schmerzphänotypen und humane Schmerzplastizität“, 2020 – 2022

PerPain: New research consortium to improve treatment response of chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders through a personalized therapy approach

6th August 2020

With a budget of approx. 2,100,000€, the BMBF funds the new research consortium “Improving outcomes in chronic musculoskeletal pain through a personalized medicine approach using cross-illness multilevel assessments and mechanism-based interventions” that involves two groups at the Central Institute of Mental Health represented by the Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience (Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Dr. h.c. Herta Flor and Dr. Martin Löffler as co-investigator) and the Department of Public Mental Health (Prof. Dr. Ulrich Reininghaus). read more...