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Mannheim Center for Translational Neuroscience

The Mannheim Center for Translational Neuroscience (MCTN) at Heidelberg University provides a platform for basic research-oriented, translational and clinical neuroscientists from the Medical Faculty Mannheim to work closely with the Central Institute for Mental Health, the life science research institutions of the University Heidelberg and with the non-university research institutions in the Rhine-Neckar metropolitan area.

Upcoming Talks and Events 

24.07.2024, 5:15 pm

Neuroscience colloquium (in German): “Liquordiagnostik in Klinik und Forschung: von der LP bis zu ZNS-spezifischen Biomarkern im Blut“, Prof. Dr. Hayrettin Tumani, University Hospital Ulm

Location: UMM, house 8, level 3, room 1 (check here for updates)

31.07.2024, 5:15 pm

Neuroscience colloquium (in German): “Acting, fast and slow: Was wir von der Tiefen Hirnstimulation über kognitive und motorische Kontrolle in den Basalganglien lernen können“, Dr. Damian Herz, University Medical Center Mainz, Clinic and Polyclinic for Neurology

Location: UMM, house 8, level 3, room 1 (check here for updates)

News

An international team of researchers has provided new insights into the molecular changes associated with the pathogenesis of inclusion body myositis (IBM), based on single-cell RNA sequencing of muscle biopsies from patients. The scientists found that certain muscle fiber types (type 2A) are particularly susceptible to the pathological processes associated with IBM - associated with genetic stress of the cells and detectable by an increase in corresponding markers indicating pronounced DNA damage in the cell nucleus. In addition, evidence of possible acetylcholinesterase dysfunction has been found in the inflamed muscles of IBM patients. read more …

On May 13-14, 2024, the final symposium of the DFG-funded Research Training Group (RTG) 2350 “Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Psychosocial and Somatic Conditions across the Lifespan” took place at the Cubex One in Mannheim. The two-day symposium provided an update on the current state of knowledge on the effects of adverse childhood experiences. read more …

 

Christian Schmahl has accepted an appointment as Professor of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapeutic Medicine at the Mannheim Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg. He is also now a core member of the MCTN. read more …

Activated T cells, which carry a specific marker protein on their surface, are controlled by natural killer (NK) cells. This is thought to be how the body suppresses destructive immune responses. Researchers at DKFZ and UMM have now discovered that NK cells can interfere with the effect of cancer therapies with immune checkpoint inhibitors in this way. They may also be responsible for the rapid decline of therapeutic CAR-T cells. Interventions in this mechanism could potentially improve the efficacy of these cellular cancer immunotherapies. read more …

Michael Platten has been awarded the 2024 Paul Martini Prize for the development of therapeutic vaccines against malignant brain tumors. The prize is awarded annually by the Paul Martini Foundation, Berlin, for outstanding achievements in clinical-therapeutic drug research. It is endowed with €50,000. read more …

This year, the European Research Council (ERC) awarded the prestigious grants to neuropsychologist and clinical psychologist Herta Flor (CIMH), who aims to improve the prevention of chronic pain and to neurologist Michael Platten (DKFZ and University Medical Center Mannheim), who will use the ERC funding to develop and test personalized cellular immunotherapies against malignant brain tumors. read more …

A new technology for all-optical monitoring and manipulation of neuronal circuits, based on 3D holography, will be established at the MCTN. Under the leadership of Simon Wiegert an application for an upright two-photon microscope for intravital fluorescence microscopy and photostimulation was approved by the German Research Foundation. read more …

Making a personalized T cell therapy for cancer patients currently takes at least six months. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the University Medical Center Mannheim have shown that the laborious first step of identifying tumor-reactive T cell receptors for patients can be replaced with a machine learning classifier that halves this time. read more …


Kontextspalte

ALUMNI

Prof. Dr. Rolf-Detlef Treede
(former MCTN Co-Director)

Prof. Dr. Martin Bohus